Sourdough BaguettesWild yeast is holding me hostage.  It’s making me bake the most intriguing  (and good tasting) breads I could ever imagine, and I don’t want to stop.

Red Quinoa Sourdough, wild yeast, levain, natural yeast. The beasties are known by many names.

Levain

Wild yeast grow a lot.  They want to be fed often.  They can get out of control fast.  Yet, they make you wait.  Anticipation of a pending bake has taken over nights of sweet somber.

 Batard

Their rogue ways require patience.  They’ll teach you to understand them.

Hurricane BouleYou’ll smile when they perform.

Bacon Onion Cranberry SourdoughThe wild yeast bread chase:  undeniable tang and flavors from long fermentations.  Shattering crust.  Moist open crumb.

Intrigued?jalapeno cheese sourdoughJust a little more time and another hundred loaves to polish techniques and we’ll journey together.

The wild beasties will capture you.

Stay tuned.

 

{ 1 comment }

Sauteed Baby Broccoli v2

The large KALE signs made us stop.

You never know what you get when you stop at a roadside fruit and vegetable stand.  This one was out in the sticks, a blur [click to continue…]

{ 3 comments }

Sauteed Cabbage v1As of late, some of you may have had your fill of Brussel sprouts, a winter vegetable that’s been trending heavily the past few winter seasons.  Do you really like Brussel sprouts?  Not too many people do, that no matter how it’s disguised.

Enter green cabbage.   [click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

Griessnockerl v2Soup and dumplings is a warming way to start a meal in cooler weather.  Griessnockerl, a steamy broth filled with semolina dumplings is often served in Austria and southern Germany.   This traditional soup has many versions.  Make this one and then adjust it to make it your own. [click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

 

Pignoli Cookies v1

Need something special for your cookie tray?   These  Italian Pignoli Cookies amp up the “oohs” and “aahs” when cookie splurgers bite through the crisp outer layer to reveal the decadently-chewy interior.   Southern Italy and [click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

kaak v1

They swing from rods in the rolling street carts, looking like purses except they’re coated with sesame seeds.  Take a closer look and you see that they are ka’ak, a Middle Eastern flatbread, popular in Lebanon, often eaten as breakfast or for a snack.   From the carts, you can get ka’ak filled with za’atar or smeared with cheese or hummus. [click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }